Are you our next Front End Developer?

Front End Developer Job TitleNew clients, projects and support commitments means that we are on the lookout for new talent to join our Belfast team. We are currently recruiting for a Front End Developer with at least 2 years’ experience to help our award winning team deliver fantastic learning experiences.

As the successful candidate, naturally you need to be front end fanatic, creative, with great user interface design and development skills and want to out-do us with your front-end thinking.

Reporting to the Operations Director, you will have freedom to work directly with clients based throughout the world on varied online learning projects such as; custom eLearning programmes, learning portals, learning assessment tools and learning management systems.

Our team isn’t huge, but have a great mix of skills, allowing us to take projects from concept through to design and development, meaning you’ll get real input into the process at all levels. You will work in a close knit team of fab web application developers, digital, graphic and instructional designers.

With every day introducing a new standard, we expect you to keep an eye on what’s happening in the industry so that you can actively contribute to our design and development approach, so we continue to lead the way in learning design and technology for our clients around the world.

HTML5 JS CSS imagesEssential criteria:

  • 3rd level degree web design or computing qualification (or similar).
  • Minimum 2 years’ experience as a Web or UX Designer in a commercial working environment.

Proficient in:

  • Photoshop/Illustrator.
  • JavaScript – jQuery- AngularJS/ or similar.

Experience in:

  • Working with a team to scope user interface flows and designing high fidelity mock-ups/prototypes for a client.
  • Designing and building creative and responsive web applications with graceful degradation.
  • Building an interface that works across multiple browsers.
  • Able to work independently as well as within a close knit team to ensure we delight our clients and project managers who make sure we keep things on track delivering on time and within budget.

Desirable but not essential criteria:

  • Experience working in ASP.Net MVC projects.
  • Experience using Visual Studio.
  • A working knowledge of a Content Management System.
  • Experience in using version control tools (such as GIT or SVN).

Salary: Negotiable depending upon experience + benefits

So if you are a Front End Developer and would you like to be designing applications that are that little bit different from what others are doing and you’re interested in pushing people’s perception of what learning is and where it can happen? then we would love to hear from you. Please submit your CV to info@aurionlearning.com.

Game on? The use of gamification in e-learning.

by Sarah Sweeney, Marketing Assistant at Aurion Learning.

SQUARE imageMany HR and L&D professionals face the problem of ensuring that their training and learning programmes maintain learner engagement and motivation. Gamification has been regularly recognised as an opportunity to help solve this problem.

In this post, we consider whether gamification can enhance the learning experience. Before we consider if it is game on for gamification in learning, it is necessary to look at what gamification essentially is.

What is Gamification?

Games and game like components have been invading the learning realm for quite some time now. Although its definition differs, for the most part, gamification in learning is the use of game mechanics to ‘gamify’ content to engage and entice users by encouraging and rewarding use.

Although Nick Pelling first coined the term “gamification” in 2002, it has actually been around for some time – 40 years in fact, with many organisations already using features in their work from video games.

Indeed, it can be said that loyalty programs, target-based bonuses and employee-of-the-month schemes are all examples of how gamification as an incentive to growth has been around for a long time too.

Examples of gamification in learning include:

  • Training: technology giants, Microsoft use gamification to train users of Microsoft Office on how to use the new ribbon interface effectively.
  • Education: New York based school – Quest to Learn, advocates game-based learning to make education more engaging and relevant to children.
  • Employee productivity: Management tool Arcaris uses gamification to improve productivity in call centres.

Now that we know what gamification is and where it is being used in learning, it is necessary to see whether it actually works.

Does Gamification in learning work?

The gamification of e-learning unquestionably presents unique possibilities for learning technologists as they explore additional ways to educate and importantly engage learners.

It is widely recognised that adding interactive activities in e-learning are no longer optional extras, but essential to effective learning. However, it is important that the addition of game like elements into the e-learning programme are only applied in the context of the programme that allow the learner the opportunity to apply their retained knowledge to live situations, rather than distract and dazzle learners with wizardry from the overall learning goal.

Frequently, my social media feeds are inundated with social games, although irritating at times, there is no escaping the surge in popularity of online gaming and social media. The site, DevHub, reported an eightfold increase in the number of users completing their sites after adding gamification elements to the process. If there was any indication that the gamification was a fad, according to research from M2 it’s here not only stay, but increase in its use.

The global market for gamification apps and services will grow to $2.8 billion by 2016.”

The enthusiasm for gamification has however met with some criticism. Game designers Radoff and Robertson have criticised gamification for excluding aspects like storytelling, an important element of learning. Whilst university researcher Deterding, has argued that current approaches to gamification create an artificial sense of achievement.

What does the successful application of gamification in e-learning look like?

  1. Gamification isn’t about games, but the learners.
  2. It isn’t about knowledge but behaviour.
  3. It extracts the motivational techniques out of games and uses them for life-applicable learning.
  4. It allows quick feedback of progress and communications of goals that need to be accomplished.

Gamification is made appealing for e-learning because of our human tendencies.  On the whole, we generally enjoy actively participating engaging and competing with others. Gamification allows learners to connect and learn together with playful applications and incentives, particularly when there are engaging game design elements used.

Today’s learners are however no longer placated with trivial reward systems but rather sophisticated experiences that hold real value. Organisations embracing the gamification in learning can stand to see learners more engaged and retain more information, but only if it is applied aptly to the e-learning programme, achieving the overall core learning objectives.

Please let us know your comments or share with others who you think may benefit from this. Follow us on twitter @aurionlearning for our latest blog articles and updates.