The Six Golden Rules for Using Graphics in E-Learning

We are all forced daily to trundle through reams of written content to get to the information we want. We have learned to quickly scan text, pick out the points of interest and ignore the rest. Today we’ll tell you how you can use graphics to highlight which information is most important for your learners and to help them to memorise it.

Why are graphics so great?

Graphics are amazing because they can easily summarise huge amounts of written information in a small space, not to mention in a memorable and aesthetically pleasing way! The rise of the infographic and the popularity of memes are just small indicators of the potential in graphics to capture learners’ attention and act as a platform for our bright ideas and learning materials.

It would be a shame for the instructional designer to put together killer learning content, for the web development team to create a robust and multi-functional platform to deliver the content on and then to fail to think through how the content will appear to users visually. Without great UX design and appealing graphics, learners will simply switch off. So we’ve created six golden rules for using graphics in E-Learning:

Six Golden Rules for Using Graphics in E-Learning

This infographic is available to download here.

1)    Graphics should simplify learning content, not complicate it.

2)    Choose graphics that will be memorable and make learning content memorable.

3)    Consistency in style is key to creating beautifully designed E-Learning.

4)    If graphics aren’t self-explanatory, be sure to include a caption or explanation.

5)    Avoid including graphics just for the sake of it – they should add to the learning, not distract from it.

6)    Always use high quality graphics.

 

Please let us know your comments or share with others who you think may benefit from this. Follow us on twitter @aurionlearning for our latest blog articles and updates.

 

Loud and Clear: Best Practice Use of Audio in E-Learning

Loud and Clear: Best Practice Use of Audio in E-Learning

So you read our last blog, 4 Questions to ask before using audio in your E-Learning and decided that it’s for you – great! In this blog, we’ll explore the different ways you can incorporate audio into your E-Learning to help you achieve higher learner engagement and enjoyment.

There are 5 main approaches to using audio in your programme:

  1. The audio and onscreen text are exactly the same.
  2. Part of the onscreen text is read aloud.
  3. The audio summarises the onscreen text.
  4. The audio elaborates on the onscreen text.
  5. The audio replaces the need for onscreen text.

 

We’ll explore the pros and cons of using each approach and recommend which one suits each type of content. It is often not a case of choosing one or the other, but rather using a combination across your programme, depending on your content.

1. The audio and onscreen text are exactly the same.

This approach involves the narrator reading aloud each word onscreen verbatim. It is often the first approach most people think of when they consider adding audio, but it is often the approach that frustrates the learner the most.

According to a survey conducted by Don Bair and Mike Dickinson from Learning Solutions Magazine, employees almost unanimously agreed that:

  1. They do not want the entire course to be narrated, and
  2. They do not want text on the screen read to them word for word.

From a practical point of view, extensive audio content adds to the file size of your programme and therefore places a major burden on loading times. This is particularly frustrating for learners with low bandwidth.

This approach is particularly difficult to manage and maintain. Any time you update your content, you need to update the audio to match, and the transcript!

The only upside to this approach is that it accommodates learners who prefer to listen to large amounts of text rather than read it, but these types of learners are few and far between, and you may prefer to explore the use of screen readers for such learners.

 

2. Part of the onscreen text is read aloud.

This approach involves the narrator reading aloud key text such as introductory text and onscreen instructions.

It is minimal text but it is enough to guide the learner through the programme and encourage them to read on and learn more. We prefer this approach because it doesn’t burden the learner with too much audio but instead gives them autonomy over their own learning and to go at their own speed.

From a practical point of view, it results in a smaller file size and is much easier to update.

There aren’t really any downsides to this approach, except it might be difficult (at times) to identify which text to include in the audio and which to leave out, and it may sound formal reading aloud onscreen instructions.

 

3. The audio summarises the onscreen text.

This approach involves the narrator providing a summary or gist of the onscreen text.

If done badly or excessively, this approach may actually confuse the learner. While they are trying to read onscreen text, they may get distracted and confused by a different voice over.

If done well and minimally, this can guide learners through the programme – setting the context in a much more conversational and informal way than reading aloud all or part of the onscreen text. This is where audio really comes into its own – when the narrator talks directly to the learner in a much more casual and friendly tone.

If you decide on this approach, be aware that you need to create and update two different scripts – one for the onscreen text and one for the audio.

 

4. The audio elaborates on the onscreen text.

This approach involves the narrator elaborating upon onscreen text such as bullet points and key words. It means that you can have minimal text onscreen and full audio over the top.

This is quite a traditional approach since it emulates the standard teacher-led or PowerPoint approach of explaining key concepts and ideas. Learners are familiar and often comfortable with this approach.

Although this type of approach exists (and is often requested), we do not recommend it – good E-Learning is more interactive than this! Why not instead provide learners with a series of engaging scenarios to spark their interest and get them actively involved instead of passively listening to a voice over actor talking at them? You can always provide pre-reading materials or supporting information explaining the concepts and ideas that you want to get across, which learners can read at their own pace.

If you choose this approach, you must heavily rely on the use of quality audio and ensure that it syncs up precisely with onscreen text. When amending your programme in the future, it can be timely and difficult.

 

5. The audio replaces the need for onscreen text.

This approach involves the narrator reading aloud from an audio script that the learner cannot see onscreen. It is often used to explain complex concepts or processes, while showing visuals or animations onscreen.

This approach is best if you have suitable visuals to represent the subject matter. However, it is more expensive and time consuming to create visuals so you may want to use this approach sparingly or in combination with another approach.

 

We hope that you have a good idea by now of how you’d like to deliver your audio content, but we’ve created a nifty table to help summarise which approach we would take with different types of screens:

Type of Screen: Use Audio:
  • Interactive scenario screens (with introductory text or instructions).

 

  • Introduction.

 

  • Summary.
Approach 2: Part of the onscreen text is read aloud;or:Approach 3: The audio summarises the onscreen text.
Highly visual (explaining complex concepts or processes). Approach 5: The audio elaborates on the onscreen text.

 

About Maresa

Maresa Molloy, Instructional Designer at Aurion Learning

 

Maresa is an Instructional Designer at Aurion Learning. She is also an avid fan of hill-walking and would love to be stuck in a lift with Andy Murray!

In her role as Instructional Designer, Maresa is responsible for working closely with Aurion client Subject Matter Experts and the in-house e-learning development team in the design and production of online and work-based learning materials for a range of programmes.

 

We would love to hear your experience with using audio in E-Learning – both successes and failures. Please let us know your comments or share with others who you think may benefit from this. Follow us on twitter @aurionlearning for our latest blog articles and updates.

 

 

 

Loud and Clear – Four Questions to ask before using audio in your E-Learning

'Loud and Clear - Four Questions to ask before using audio in your E-Learning' and a picture of a speaker

Not all E-Learning programmes need to have audio, but it can help learners and create interest, if used well. This blog forms the first of a two part series which will highlight the different questions you should ask before using audio in your E-Learning and the different ways to incorporate it.

There are a number of practical questions you can ask yourself before you think about using audio. These will not only help you decide if you need audio but also how you might manage the recording and updating of it.

1. What technology do your target audience use?

 Is it likely that your target audience:

    • Have speakers or headphones in which to hear the audio?

 You can of course add audio transcripts for those that don’t have speakers or headphones, but it would be unnecessary providing audio if the majority of your learners don’t have them.

    • Have sufficient bandwidth to cope with a larger file size?

 Audio increases the file size of your E-Learning and it can significantly slow down loading times.

 

2.    What are your budget limitations and timescales?

Consider if you are willing to:

    • Invest in good quality audio.

This can be as simple as investing in a good quality microphone, and investing some more on soundproofing equipment. But don’t compromise on your audio. According to Byron Reeves and Clifford Nass at Stanford University, audio quality matters a lot so online learners are unforgiving when it’s recorded badly. If you are in doubt about the quality of your audio, have it recorded professionally.

    • Take the time to add audio to your programme and sync it up with onscreen text.

 This can take some time, especially if your text builds onscreen. Be prepared to add your audio at the end once all of your text is finalised and agreed, otherwise your audio will be out of date very quickly.

    • Provide and update an audio transcript.

 An audio transcript will help users with hearing difficulties read the audio at their own pace. If you add audio, make sure you are prepared to add this and update it when you make any changes to your content.

 

3.    Will your programme require any updates and if so, how often?

If you anticipate that you will make a lot of updates to your content over time, consider if you are willing to record new audio each time you make the changes. This is why deciding on the approach to audio is especially important from the onset – if you choose to record all of your onscreen text, are you prepared to record all of this content if you make even minor updates to your content?

 

4.    What is the nature of your content?

The subject(s) you will be covering will of course help you decide how much audio you will use in your programme. We’ll cover this in our next blog where we’ll explore the different approaches for the use of audio.

 

About Maresa

Maresa Molloy, Instructional Designer at Aurion Learning

 

Maresa is an Instructional Designer at Aurion Learning. She is also an avid fan of hill-walking and would love to be stuck in a lift with Andy Murray!

In her role as Instructional Designer, Maresa is responsible for working closely with Aurion client Subject Matter Experts and the in-house e-learning development team in the design and production of online and work-based learning materials for a range of programmes.

 

 

Please let us know your comments or share with others who you think may benefit from this. Follow us on twitter @aurionlearning for our latest blog articles and updates.

 

How does Tin Can API work in the real world?

How does Tin Can API work in the real world?

I’m sure that by now many of you will already have come across the biggest buzzword to hit E-Learning town since the second coming of SCORM in 2004.

Yes folks, a new standard has landed on our shores and it’s called Tin Can API (AKA Experience API).

So what is Tin Can? What does it do? What does it look like? And what can it do for your organisation? Well let’s have a look.

To fully understand Tin Can it’s necessary to appreciate the history and indeed the limitations of our old friend SCORM. SCORM has been the leading industry standard since 2001 for the tracking and recording of many a learner’s online training history. Quite simply SCORM will record the following details of a learner’s achievements:

  • Has the learner begun their course?
  • Is the course complete or incomplete?
  • Did the learner pass or fail?
  • What score was achieved?

There are a few extra functions that never became common practice, so in essence that’s really all that SCORM does.

“But what’s so wrong with that?” you may ask. No doubt much of SCORM’s success has been down to the simplicity it offers, both for content designers, LMS developers and administrators. But since those bygone days of 2001 the world, and indeed technology, have progressed to now offer us a much more comprehensive means of recording our learning experiences.

So how does this work in the real world? Well gather round and I’ll tell you a tale….

Once upon a time, in a business far far down the road, a young accountant called Alice decided she would like to further her knowledge and skills by learning more about accountancy law. She spoke with her colleagues from learning and development who enrolled her on an online course. “Woohoo!” she said when she completed her online course with a pass mark of 95%, before going on to read 2 accountancy law books, several journals, and learned from many discussions with colleagues and online peers.

Not long afterwards, Alice seen an opportunity for promotion to a job in which accountancy law was a big factor. Feeling enthused she asked her learning and development team to provide a report on her training so far. But when she received the report all it said was that she once did an online course and achieved a 95% pass mark.

“Awww” thought Alice. “It’s just a pity our L&D team were not able to record all the other studying, research and practice I got after I did my online course. If only there was another way…”

Well folks, dry your eyes and put your hankies away, because the answer is here and it’s called Tin Can API.

You see, the main benefit of Tin Can is that it is designed with the simplicity to make it easily adoptable, whilst remaining dynamic enough to record much more of the everyday life experiences that are fundamental to our learning and development.

So here it is in a nutshell…

Tin Can works by recording just 3 simple variables, those being a noun (Object), a verb (action), and another noun. Quite simply, this can be translated into the following:

[Person X] [Had] [This particular learning experience]

Here are some examples:

Noun

Verb

Noun

Alice

Read

The fundamentals of accountancy law (a book)

Alice

Visited

www.Accountacylaw.com
(a website)

Alice

Watched

A presentation on YouTube of accountancy law

Alice

Commented

In an online discussion on accountancy law

 

Simple, eh? The truth is that Tin Can API is the first standard that strives to embrace what we learn in the ‘University of Life’. And with the progress of modern technology (Smartphones, Tablet PCs, Cloud computing etc.) we now for the first time have the means to record much of the informal learning that plays such a big part in our professional and personal development.

And there’s more! Tin Can is independent from specific LMS’s, so no need to remember your username and request a password reset. Mobile and desktop apps are now becoming available that can record your learning activity at literally the touch of a button.

Here’s an example:

Alice is sitting at home surfing the net. She comes across a website all about accountancy law which she finds very informative. Once finished, instead of just moving on, Alice hits a ‘Tin Can’ link on her browser which automatically records the website she was on. Alice can also add comments which will aid her with reflective learning, or she can even share it with colleagues or with peers from a social learning group. All at the touch of a button.

On another day, Alice reads a book. The book doesn’t have a link (as most books don’t!). But Alice can use the Tin Can API App on her smartphone to take a photo of the book, or even to scan the book’s barcode, before sending the precious data off to be stored online. Again, all at the touch of a button.

In essence, we are only beginning to realise the potential that Tin Can API can offer. The simplicity of the ‘Noun, Verb, and Noun’ approach means data can easily be shared across systems and with other learners. It also means that our offline learning can now be captured, reflected upon and reported with ease.

So there you have it. Now that you’ve seen how it works and how it can be applied, maybe now is the time to begin thinking about how you too can implement Tin Can into your organisation to give a richer, more fulfilling learning experience to your learners.

About Ciarán

Ciaran Friel - Instructional Designer

 

Ciarán joined the Aurion Learning team as an Instructional Designer in 2014 and has held a number of positions within the educational and training sector over the past 12 years.

In his role as Instructional Designer, Ciarán is responsible for working closely with Aurion client Subject Matter Experts and the in-house e-learning development team in the design and production of online and work-based learning materials for a range of programmes.

 

 

Please let us know your comments or share with others who you think may benefit from this. Follow us on twitter @aurionlearning for our latest blog articles and updates.

Gamification of E-Learning in 2015

Image of a trophy and gamification icons, accompanied by the name of the blog article.

The use of game mechanics to increase learners’ motivation is not a new concept, but this year gamification is set to come of age, moving away from being viewed as a gimmick to becoming a real contender as one of the key techniques used to motivate and engage learners. We can all expect to see gamification become more practical, more integrated, more fun and more common so we want to share why it’s so exciting!

In our predictions of the top digital learning trends for 2015, we noted an influx in the use of gamification in E-Learning and we were far from the only ones. A report by Ambient Insight placed the annual global growth rate for game-based learning at 8.3% and predicted that revenues would amount to a massive $2.3 billion by 2017.

Why is gamification so effective?

Keller’s Model of Motivational Design outlines four strategies for motivating learners:

  1. Attention
  2. Relevance
  3. Confidence
  4. Satisfaction

Gamification is brilliant because it incorporates all four of these tactics to draw in and engross learners. The use of gaming narratives, mechanics and graphics will draw the attention of learners whilst the application of knowledge will reinforce the relevance of learning materials. Learners will have their confidence boosted by the progress they witness during their learning adventures and E-Learning which incorporates rewards and recognition will create a great sense of learner satisfaction.

In the digital age, learners have various forms of information and entertainment competing for their attention. The challenge of the educator is to deliver their information in the most relevant and gripping way.

What will be different in 2015?

Gamification will be:

  • More practical – digital learning creators have often confused gamification with the introduction of badges and reward systems. These superficial styles of gamifying E-Learning can complement more sophisticated game mechanics but most learners are not placated by trivial rewards. Instead, in 2015, we predict the employment of gamification techniques that really motivate learners. Expect to see more simulation, animations and narrative based games.

 

  • More integrated – it isn’t necessary to create a whole new virtual world to gamify your E-Learning and motivate learners. The most successful gamification efforts are those that create interactivity for learners in simple and effective ways. If you want to adopt gamification without having to invest huge amounts of time and resources, consider using puzzles, scenarios and short, fun games regularly throughout your E-Learning.

 

  • More fun – the exciting emergence of new technologies and innovations within the gaming industry is spilling over into the gamification of E-Learning. New technologies that create the potential for virtual and augmented reality mean that games have become more realistic and life like. Whilst few organisations will immediately be able to implement these technologies in 2015, the adoption of sharper graphics and high definition displays will bring games to life for learners and create more fun!

 

  • More common – as we noted before, gamification is growing. Mike Liebhold,  senior researcher and distinguished fellow at The Institute for the Future captures the driving force behind this growth perfectly when he says, “The development of ‘serious games’ applied productively to a wide scope of human activities will accelerate simply because playing is more fun than working.”

 

Please let us know your comments or share with others who you think may benefit from this. Follow us on twitter @aurionlearning for our latest blog articles and updates.

Selecting the right Learning Management System for your organisation

Image of a computer fashioned as a shop window with the blog title, "Selecting the right Learning Management System for your organisation"

With organisations increasingly keen to monitor both formal and social learning, Learning Management Systems (LMSs) are set to be a big trend for 2015.

In a market saturated with over 600 learning management solutions, (yes, that many!) choosing the right LMS for your organisation can be a daunting task but will reap huge benefits in terms of money savings, time efficiency and the ability to deliver innovative and effective learning campaigns.

In this latest post, we’ll help point you in the right direction.

What is an LMS and why do you need one?

An LMS is a software application which will allow you to manage all aspects of your online learning; including administration, tracking learner progress and the delivery of learning content. A good LMS will make the organisational, technical and administrative tasks associated with delivering online learning into a simple, manageable process.

In his presentation: 7 Questions you must ask before purchasing an LMS, Business Development Manager at Aurion Learning, Gavin Woods outlined the seven key questions you should ask to avoid LMS disappointment:

  1. Is it easy to implement?
  2. Is it easy to customise and configure?
  3. Is it secure?
  4. Is in-depth reporting available?
  5. Does it have strong functionality?
  6. Is it scalable?
  7. Do I want to work with this vendor?

See the full presentation here.

In 2015, there are five industry wide trends that we predict will affect LMS choice and that you’ll want to take into consideration as you future proof your E-Learning:

  1. The widespread adoption of big data in E-Learning
  2. The emergence of Tin Can API
  3. An increase in self-directed, informal learning
  4. A further rise in mobile learning
  5. The integration of learning management and talent management

Ultimately, the aim is to find an LMS which is robust, functional and future proof, as well as being within your budget. Each organisation will have different requirements in terms of technical and functional requirements.

Before approaching any vendors, we recommend sitting down with representatives from across your organisation and discussing what you need to have and what you would like to have.

It’s likely that your LMS will be used by more than just your learning and development team, so remember to include colleagues working in management, human resources, marketing and anyone else who will use the LMS on a regular basis.

With so much LMS choice available, it can be hard to select the right one for your organisational needs. At team Aurion, we’ve selected three LMS solutions that we regularly recommend to a wide range of organisations and outlined which learner needs they meet most effectively:

NetDimensions Learning

Described by Brandon Hall as “bulletproof”, this LMS is notorious for its technical dependability and is ideal for high information or compliance based industries.

With inbuilt talent management integration, it benefits both the human resources and training department by tracking and recording learner progress as well as potentially reporting workplace performance. NetDimensions Learning is used all over the world and its translation and localisation capabilities make it ideal for organisations operating in several countries or using numerous languages. Customer service is reportedly helpful and quick.

LearnUpon

Recently named by independent reporter Learning Light as one of its top 8 learning management systems, LearnUpon is famed for being a simple, easy to set up LMS where administrators can quickly upload and share learning content.

With a transparent payment plan and ability to create new learning content at a fast pace, it is a favourite amongst training providers. As a cloud based LMS, it is highly competitive in terms of data security, accessibility and customisation.

Moodle

For many in the academic world, the word Moodle is synonymous with E-Learning. This open source, highly scalable LMS is seen by many as the unquestionable forerunner in the race for best LMS.

Also voted by Learning Light as one of the top 8 LMSs, it stands out from the crowd because of the cost benefits it offers, its consistent development and innovation and the community of developers who continually create new features and ways of delivering digital learning. It is great for creating mobile learning and is compatible with Tin Can API.

Although it is free, you will need to partner with someone who knows how to use it and will help you to keep abreast with the constant changes associated with a Moodle LMS deployment.

Please let us know your comments or share with others who you think may benefit from this. Follow us on twitter @aurionlearning for our latest blog articles and updates.

 

New to E-Learning? Where to get started

Infographic containing the E-Learning advice from the blog below.

This infographic is available to download here.

1. Learning strategy
Define your aims and identify issues that need to be resolved.

2. Set quantitative goals for progress and definitions of success
Make a list of measurable outcomes you could expect to see as a result

3. Identify a solution that fits both the goals and the audience
Keep in mind the age and background of users, their level of technology adoption and what sort of devices they will be using to access learning content

4. Get buy-in
Communicate issues, goals and expectations to stakeholders. Make sure they understand the value of a new E-Learning programme

5. Ask internal subject matter experts to summarise content
Identify the experts within your organisation and ask them to share their expertise with you.

6. Assess the technical requirements
Check out our Jargon Buster handbook for E-Learning newbies.

7. Instructional design
Apply best practice pedagogical principles. Think rich, concise content, heaps of interactivity and beautiful multimedia.

8. Begin to design and develop
Keep in mind accessibility and usability when choosing fonts and colours.

9. Pilot
Ask an internal group of stakeholders to test and review your learning campaign.

10. Amend where necessary
Take on board the feedback given by your pilot group and decide which changes are necessary. Small, incremental change will help to ensure that the baby isn’t thrown out with the bath water.

11. Collect data on learner progress
Check out our blog: Big Data: Big Results for E-Learning?

12. Assess the success of your E-Learning
Check out our blog: How to work out if your E-Learning programme is a success and what to do if it isn’t.

Please let us know your comments or share with others who you think may benefit from this. Follow us on twitter @aurionlearning for our latest blog articles and updates.

How to work out if your E-Learning is a success and what to do if it isn’t

Image saying containing an illustration of a businessman flying into the sky in a rocket with a briefcase on which has been written the word SUCCESS. The title of this image is 'How to work out if your E-Learning is a success and what to do if it isn't'

In a bid to rush to the next project, many E-Learning professionals carelessly skip over the evaluation process. Because we believe it is vital to learn from experience, our mantra of the moment is:

 “Sometimes you win, sometimes you learn”.

Therefore, today we want to take the opportunity to unpack best practice in E-Learning evaluation.

Evaluation is often overlooked because people lack the time, patience or clarity on the right approach or tool to use. Often, they are unsure of what data to collect or how to use it once they have collected it.

The first step in evaluating an E-Learning campaign lies in identifying the success metrics or performance parameters. These are formed by aligning or comparing organisational aims and goals with the results of the learning campaign.

Following this crucial first step, there are a number of ideas and approach methods to evaluation. One of the foremost ideas being propounded currently is Kirkpatrick’s taxonomy.

Kirkpatrick identified four levels or criteria for successful training evaluation:

Level 1: Learner reaction

Level 2: Learner knowledge

Level 3: Learner behaviour

Level 4: Learning results or impact

Sadly, many learning and development departments move no farther in their evaluations than level one or two.

They listen to how a selection of learners feel about the learning campaign and measure how much information they have retained but fail to research how the newfound information is being applied or what impact it is having on the organisation.

So what are the best tools to use to evaluate success?

We recommend a combination of the following:

  • Knowledge assessments both before and after completing training to assess learning progress;
  • Conducting a pilot to spot flaws early on;
  • Using big data to track learner engagement as well as weak points within the E-Learning content;
  • On the job assessments by management to gauge behavioural changes;
  • A forum (such as Survey Monkey) to receive feedback from learners about their personal experience;
  • Encouraging learners and stakeholders to give feedback in the long term; and
  • Brinkerhoff’s Success Case Method suggests that we must look at success at an organisational or system level rather than just the individual learning programme. Brinkerhoff also asserts that it is useful to look at the “outliers” i.e. those who have been particularly successful or unsuccessful. By looking at these outliers, it may be possible to identify the differentiators between E-Learning success and failure on an individual level.

Now what?

After using this toolkit to evaluate your E-Learning success, you may find that learners are happy, clued in, applying their knowledge and your organisation is flourishing.

Hooray for you!

If you have a different result and find issues with your E-Learning, then take a deep breath, it’s going to be okay!

There are a number of reasons why your E-Learning campaign might not have hit the target this time.

It could be as a result of lack of support from management, the learning campaign being too theoretical or inaccuracy in identifying knowledge gaps pre-training. Luckily, your evaluation should point you in the right direction.

An important nugget of knowledge to keep in mind is not to throw the baby out with the bath water. In the majority of situations, change can be made in small, incremental amounts.

We recommend asking the people who have given you feedback and identified issues to become part of the solution by suggesting what they would have needed or preferred to better their learning experience.

There is always room for improvement and evaluation is one of the most consistently helpful tools we have at our disposal as learning and development professionals. Just remember our mantra, “Sometimes you win, sometimes you learn”.

 

Please let us know your comments or share with others who you think may benefit from this. We’d love to hear about your biggest E-Learning successes and failures. What is your strategy for recovering and fixing your mistakes? Follow us on twitter @aurionlearning for our latest blog articles and updates.